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Steve Winter

Bio NatGeo Wildlife + Conservation Photojournalist + Speaker. Next @NGLive talk: Aug 14th. Sandy Springs, Ga. Follow link for Tickets.

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image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @africanparksnetwork
Here children from a local village close to @Zakouma_national_park are vi" - 1845705780399253140
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@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @africanparksnetwork Here children from a local village close to @Zakouma_national_park are visiting the park and seeing the amazing animals. They see the wildlife up close instead of just on TV or seeing the tourists drive by their village, and wonder why they are here and what they are seeing - the children participate in the wonder of their park and benefit from the schools, healthcare and jobs for their mothers, fathers and other family members - a true ecosystem that works for the good of all. It is so important to include the local communities in any conservation effort regarding protection of a National Park and the animals which live within. Finding sustainable solutions so people and wildlife can share the surrounding areas. And providing jobs from the park for the communities - training to be guards, tourism and providing education and health care to the communities that live close - so the park, management and communities are their own ecosystem - all working to protect the land and the animals within. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their way back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

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image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo stevewinterphoto @africaparksnetwork

Happy World Elephant Day🐘
@Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnet" - 1844708377105816294
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@natgeo stevewinterphoto @africaparksnetwork Happy World Elephant Day🐘 @Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – the abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

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image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @visitcitysprings @citysprings
I am excited to be giving my NG Live presentation “On the Trail" - 1843013247600860553
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@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @visitcitysprings @citysprings I am excited to be giving my NG Live presentation “On the Trail of Big Cats” at City Springs Performing Arts Center in Atlanta this Tuesday August 14th at 8pm. A lion coming down a tree in Queen Elizabeth Park in Uganda. Just 100 years ago there may have been as many as 500,000 lions which roamed the African continent but today there it is estimated that as few as 16,000 - 30,000 remain, and research by lion biologist Hans Bauer and colleagues suggests lions in much of west, east and central Africa will decline by 50% in the next two decades if something dramatic is not done! The biggest threats facing lions in Africa are poaching of their prey and retaliatory killings by farmers when lions eat their cattle! There is also an emerging threat of lions being used in Chinese medicine as tigers become rarer. @wildaid "When the buying stops the killing can too" me @stevewinterphoto to see more images from my work with @natgeo and Thanks!! @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @africanparksnetwork @reddigitalcinema @CanonUSA

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

Today is International Cat Day!! In memory of the man who dedicated his life to savi" - 1841772800488360546
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Today is International Cat Day!! In memory of the man who dedicated his life to saving big cats. Dr. Alan Rabinowitz One of my favorite images! of a female leopard in a tree at night under the stars. She has an impala in the tree that she is feeding on. She is waiting for an opening so she can jump down amongst 6 hyenas scattered around the base of the tree - hoping she will drop some of the impala - but she wants to be sure - that she does not end up as dinner either! There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. This was shot while on assignment for National Geographic Magazine (Dec 2015 issue). Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest.Forest, grasslands and mountains give us 75% of the fresh water. If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the jaguar and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them. So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves. me @stevewinterphoto to see other images, thanks! @natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @eiainvestigator @africanparksnetwork @sanctuaryasia @CanonUSA

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "Sunday the world lost a visionary giant of conservation, a warrior for big cats—Alan Rabinowitz. I am filled with deep, " - 1840844260259456915
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Sunday the world lost a visionary giant of conservation, a warrior for big cats—Alan Rabinowitz. I am filled with deep, deep sadness in the pit of my heart and soul for loss of a man that I worked closely with for two decades. I wanted to share images I shot in the field from the three National Geographic Magazine stories that I produced with Alan—and from the many other expeditions we shared to remote corners of the world Alan used to say there are still wild places left on earth - and he was determined to find them, study them and protect them. I was honored to walk with him (always behind him - as he walked so very fast) in the field and share in his thoughts and ideas. Alan lives on in my memories, his books, papers and his vision for big cats, especially jaguars, establishing the world's first jaguar reserve in Belize and his efforts to create a jaguar corridor across the cat’s entire range from Mexico to Argentina. I am grateful for the so very large life he lived; for all the lives he touched and changed; for his work founding Panthera; for a lifetime spent working to understand and protect big cats. I lecture widely on big cats for Nat Geo—and I always include images of Alan, stories of our time together and highlight the far-reaching impacts of his conservation work. I learned so very very much from Alan. My life changed in November 1996, I “cold called” him, and asked him ifvhe thought it possible to produce the first-ever jag story for NGM. His answer - yes. I will never forget calling Alan from a pay phone (the phone was in the shape of a Hyacinth Macaw) in Porto Jofre Brazil and telling him I just saw 5 jaguars in a week. His excitement from that call lives with me today. Alan mentored young scientists, and was so prolific in his papers and books—first-person books that made conservation accessible to everyone, engaging people with his explorer spirit and his love for the natural world and the big cats that roam within it. His words and stories touched so many lives in such a positive way. Alan’s legacy will live on, forever. To Salisa, Alex and Alana - you are all in my thoughts, as are all of Alan’s loved ones, friends, colleagues—and the big cats

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@africanparksnetwork @natgeo

Ele’s playing with birds
@Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of t" - 1839263789629228548
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@africanparksnetwork @natgeo Ele’s playing with birds @Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@africanparksnetwork @natgeo 
@Zakouma_National_park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystem" - 1837709463370600607
Report Download 90 13.64K

@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @Zakouma_National_park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@africanparksnetwork @natgeo - shot on iPhone

@Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most " - 1837073455646090646
Report Download 46 9.87K

@africanparksnetwork @natgeo - shot on iPhone @Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork, is one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo @africanparksnetwork @stevewinterphoto shot on a iPhone
Rangers are on the frontlines protecting the animals and" - 1836491714573246399
Report Download 36 4.25K

@natgeo @africanparksnetwork @stevewinterphoto shot on a iPhone Rangers are on the frontlines protecting the animals and the communities of @africanparksnetwork Zakouma National Park in Chad. - July 31st and everyday!! Rangers are often the first, and last line of defense not just in protecting the world’s wildlife, but in providing safety for millions of people around the world. Here in Zakouma National Park in Chad, after a devastating eight years where poaching reduced the elephant population from 4,000 to 400, the rangers are doing more than just holding the line. In 2010 in partnership with the Chadian Government, conservation organization African Parks @africanparksnetwork assumed management of the park and overhauled law enforcement. It wasn’t for the faint of heart. Just a year after cracking down on poaching, six rangers will killed by poachers during their morning prayers before going out on patrol. But the rangers persevered and continued in their fight to protect the Park, its wildlife, and the surrounding communities. Eight years later, poaching has essentially become non-existent. Employment is on the rise, thousands of children are going to schools built by the park, and tourism is booming. Rhinos were even reintroduced after a 50-year absence just in May, and elephants are on the rise for the first time in a decade. A record number of elephant calves were recently counted - showing new life and hope has been restored to Zakouma, thanks to the rangers. To follow these ranger stories today on World Ranger Day, and every day, please visit @africanparksnetwork who has the largest ranger force in Africa. Shot on iPhone @leonardodicapriofdn

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo @stevewinterphoto 
Rangers checking tracks that should not be there in @africanparksnetwork Zakouma National Par" - 1835733183108619130
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@natgeo @stevewinterphoto Rangers checking tracks that should not be there in @africanparksnetwork Zakouma National Park in Chad. - July 31st and everyday!! Rangers are often the first, and last line of defense not just in protecting the world’s wildlife, but in providing safety for millions of people around the world. Here in Zakouma National Park in Chad, after a devastating eight years where poaching reduced the elephant population from 4,000 to 400, the rangers are doing more than just holding the line. In 2010 in partnership with the Chadian Government, conservation organization African Parks @africanparksnetwork assumed management of the park and overhauled law enforcement. It wasn’t for the faint of heart. Just a year after cracking down on poaching, six rangers will killed by poachers during their morning prayers before going out on patrol. But the rangers persevered and continued in their fight to protect the Park, its wildlife, and the surrounding communities. Eight years later, poaching has essentially become non-existent. Employment is on the rise, thousands of children are going to schools built by the park, and tourism is booming. Rhinos were even reintroduced after a 50-year absence just in May, and elephants are on the rise for the first time in a decade. A record number of elephant calves were recently counted - showing new life and hope has been restored to Zakouma, thanks to the rangers. To follow these ranger stories today on World Ranger Day, and every day, please visit @africanparksnetwork who has the largest ranger force in Africa. @leonardodicapriofdn

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@africanparksnetwork @stevewinterphoto @natgeo
Ranger in Zakouma National Park in Chad. #worldrangerday - which is today" - 1835627288123102002
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@africanparksnetwork @stevewinterphoto @natgeo Ranger in Zakouma National Park in Chad. - which is today and everyday!! Rangers are often the first, and last line of defense not just in protecting the world’s wildlife, but in providing safety for millions of people around the world. Here in Zakouma National Park in Chad, after a devastating eight years where poaching reduced the elephant population from 4,000 to 400, the rangers are doing more than just holding the line. In 2010 in partnership with the Chadian Government, conservation organization African Parks @africanparksnetwork assumed management of the park and overhauled law enforcement. It wasn’t for the faint of heart. Just a year after cracking down on poaching, six rangers will killed by poachers during their morning prayers before going out on patrol. But the rangers persevered and continued in their fight to protect the Park, its wildlife, and the surrounding communities. Eight years later, poaching has essentially become non-existent. Employment is on the rise, thousands of children are going to schools built by the park, and tourism is booming. Rhinos were even reintroduced after a 50-year absence just in May, and elephants are on the rise for the first time in a decade. A record number of elephant calves were recently counted - showing new life and hope has been restored to Zakouma, thanks to the rangers. To follow these ranger stories today on World Ranger Day, and every day, please visit @africanparksnetwork who has the largest ranger force in Africa.

image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

Tomorrow is world #worldtigerday and it marks a celebration of the worlds largest an" - 1833501593355852849
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Tomorrow is world and it marks a celebration of the worlds largest and favorite big cat. Tigers are an endangered species that need our help in a big way! There may be fewer than 2500 individuals left in the wild and scientists believe breeding populations occur in only eight countries and 40 population strongholds across Asia! My tiger work for @natgeo magazine over the past 20 years has taken me to document tigers in places as wild as Kaziranga National Park in India and northern Sumatra in Indonesia and I see the same threats facing this iconic species: poaching, deforestation and an increasing body part trade in China! When the demand for wild and captive tiger parts stops so too will the poaching of this beautiful cat! “when the buying stops the killing can too" We need to unite in saving this iconic big cat that is an ambassador of wild places and human cultures! Tigers are also the most important apex predators in forests across Eurasia and when you lose them from a forest, deer and pig numbers can increase and the forest loses an important ecosystem engineer! Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest.Forest, grasslands and mountains give us 75% of the fresh water. If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the jaguar and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the TIGERS and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them. So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves. Visit National Geographic's big cats initiative to find out how to save iconic species like this tiger and other big cats today! @natgeo @natgeocreative @nglive @africanparksnetwork @leonardodicaprio @wildaid