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National Wildlife Federation

Bio See the stunning wildlife and landscapes we work to protect! Read more about Counts contest: http://bit.ly/2MAVbub

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One year ago, the National Wildlife Federation and Paul G. Allen’s @vulcanproduction asked students ages 9-18 to help find the next big idea that could make a material difference for African elephants. Ben Radke, age 12, from Ozark, AR, came up with the winning idea, “Elephant Pride and Bus Rides.” Radke recently returned from his all-expense-paid trip to Botswana. While there he met Naledi, the famous orphaned elephant who was featured in Naledi, One Little Elephant, a documentary film, and inspired the contest. Radke’s parents reported that spending time with the elephants and their caretakers was an unforgettable learning experience and he has now gained a completely new interest in photography and storytelling. Ben says the experience was, “The best days of my life! The whole thing was amazing and unbelievable. Getting to be close to the elephants was amazing and getting to touch them or being touched by them was super-amazing!” We now know that we are losing 96 elephants a day, or 25,000 to 30,000 annually. Data from Paul Allen’s 2016 Great Elephant Census found that we have lost 30 percent of the African savanna elephant population in less than 7 years. Learn more about Ben’s trip and how you can bring conservation classroom activites to your school – link in bio! 🐘 Special thanks to @officialpaulallen @elephantscount @aidanrgallagher @lauraturnerseydel &

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image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "After plucking a long-stemmed flower from an alpine meadow, this plump pika scampered to a perch and nibbled away, devou" - 1836461748695339571
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After plucking a long-stemmed flower from an alpine meadow, this plump pika scampered to a perch and nibbled away, devouring the entire snack bottom to top. “There was nothing left,” says Don Jones, who was lucky enough to catch the action through his lens. A veteran wildlife photographer who specializes in big-game species, Jones had been photographing elk in a crowded national park in Alberta, Canada, when he decided to grab some quiet time with smaller creatures. “I was hoping for some alone time,” he says. “It’s like detox, getting away from everyone and having fun with these little critters.” His quest to find pikas paid off when this cooperative little guy showed up for lunch. Jones has had many unforgettable moments with wildlife during his 25-year career, but feels most gratified when people say they appreciate nature more after seeing his work. “I feel empowered when I hear that,” he says. “These animals have given me a lot. I want to give something back.” Excerpt from National Wildlife Magazine.

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image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "North America’s greatest diversity of hummingbirds is found along the U.S.–Mexico border. Southeastern Arizona alone hos" - 1835800258795607209
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North America’s greatest diversity of hummingbirds is found along the U.S.–Mexico border. Southeastern Arizona alone hosts up to 15 different species during the migration season, which peaks from early April through late September, making southeastern Arizona a hotspot for hummingbird researchers. These days, much of that research focuses on the potential effects climate change may have on the birds. Like most wildlife, hummingbirds have long faced the dangers posed by habitat loss and fragmentation. Yet many experts now consider climate change to be the leading threat to these much beloved birds—known to John James Audubon as “glittering fragments of the rainbow.” Hummingbirds’ biology makes them particularly vulnerable to climate change. Weighing little more than a few dimes stacked together, a hummingbird is about as small as an animal can be and remain endothermic (or “warm-blooded”)—capable of maintaining a stable body temperature independent of the surrounding environment. Their small size means hummers have limited tolerance for high-temperature extremes. During heat waves, they can be forced to seek shade rather than foraging for food. Excerpt from National Wildlife Magazine.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Tail clutching a knobby arm of fan coral, this pygmy seahorse—no bigger than a fingernail—perfectly matches the color an" - 1831373997746789986
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Tail clutching a knobby arm of fan coral, this pygmy seahorse—no bigger than a fingernail—perfectly matches the color and pattern of its chosen hideout some 90 feet below the sea in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photographers Dan and John Cesere battled strong currents to capture this rare and remarkable portrait, a labor of love they call Sweetheart. “In nature,” says Dan, “there’s more than meets the eye—if you take the time to look.” Excerpt from National Wildlife Magazine. 📸: @ceserebrothers

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "In March, National Wildlife Federation and @beesponsible announced the launch of ‘Don’t Kill My Buzz’, a social advocacy" - 1829929803434063714
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In March, National Wildlife Federation and @beesponsible announced the launch of ‘Don’t Kill My Buzz’, a social advocacy campaign aimed at reversing the decline of bee populations and promoting bee-friendly, pesticide-free gardening and conservation efforts. The partnership was inspired by last year’s decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to add the first bumble bee (the rusty patched bumble bee) to the endangered species list as part of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. This was a big step for pollinators, as insects are underrepresented on the endangered species list. Want to help us protect native bees? For each + Beesponsible tag, Beesponsible will donate $1 to our wildlife-friendly gardening programs. Tag your friend below and ask them to "beesponsible"! Read more at the link in our bio 🐝

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "A cougar sips from a stream in Arizona’s Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. Like all monuments, it was created in larg" - 1829829614262031067
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A cougar sips from a stream in Arizona’s Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. Like all monuments, it was created in large part to safeguard the region’s spectacular biodiversity. Monuments play a critical role providing habitat corridors for animals such as cougars that need to move across the landscape to find water, food or mates. In terrestrial habitats, many species’ survival depends on moving with the seasons to find food, yet human development has decreased wildlife’s ability to migrate across the landscape. “Especially in the West, monuments provide critical migration corridors that will become even more important as climate changes and development increases,” says former NWF public lands fellow Sara Cawley. Oregon’s Cascade–Siskiyou National Monument, for instance, protects a narrow, high-elevation biological corridor between the Cascade Range and the Klamath–Siskiyou mountains for species such as the Pacific fisher. Excerpt from National Wildlife Magazine.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Even without road mortality, many turtle populations are declining as habitat is fragmented or destroyed. “Some of these" - 1827955438895220238
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Even without road mortality, many turtle populations are declining as habitat is fragmented or destroyed. “Some of these,” says John Kleopfer of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (@virginiawildlife), “are what we call ghost populations, made up of old turtles just hanging on with little or no recruitment.” Bog turtles of the eastern United States are one example. “There are several sites throughout their range where researchers are just finding the same old adults year after year, with no evidence of hatchlings and subadults,” says Kleopfer. “With consistent losses, they’ll reach a breaking point and crash.” What can be done? In addition to alerting drivers with “turtle crossing” signs, there’s a move to design safe passages to steer the reptiles away from danger. A 2012 fencing project in Massachusetts that kept turtles off a heavily trafficked road reduced mortality there by 90 percent. And researchers are testing new fence and tunnel designs to lead turtles to safety. Such knowledge will help biologists develop more-effective turtle-saving tools. Excerpt from National Wildlife Magazine.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "In partnership with @beesponsible, we’re excited to share three ways for you to help bees and other pollinators in your " - 1809603251601337053
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In partnership with @beesponsible, we’re excited to share three ways for you to help bees and other pollinators in your backyard and community! •🐝• You can spread the word about the decline of many bee species with your friends. Tag a friend below with the hashtag to get them involved! Also, each time you use the hashtag – @beesponsible donates $1 to our wildlife-friendly gardening programs. •🐝• Ask your city council to pass a Beesponsible Proclamation to draw attention to unite in saving bees! •🐝• Ask your town’s parks department to create a public, bee-friendly garden at a local library or town hall! •🐝• Learn more about how to be a BEEadvocate by reading our blog – link in our bio!

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Bees are an incredibly important group of wildlife. The service they provide by pollinating both our agricultural crops " - 1774763263687754247
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Bees are an incredibly important group of wildlife. The service they provide by pollinating both our agricultural crops as well as wild plants is critical for our food supply and for maintaining healthy ecosystems upon which all species, including us, rely. But, how much do you actually know about these industrious insects? Take our Beesponsible quiz (link in bio ⬆️) and find out! Here’s a hint for one of the questions: Long-horned bees + squash bees do not live communally 🐝 For more information on @Beesponsible, how you can help bees, and how to participate in a fun social media campaign to support the National Wildlife Federation’s work including the Garden for Wildlife program, visit Beesponsible.com and follow @Beesponsible on social media.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "As human development consumes habitat, wild creatures either disappear or learn to live near people. The most widely dis" - 1771206396446248820
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As human development consumes habitat, wild creatures either disappear or learn to live near people. The most widely distributed carnivores, red foxes are so adapted to urban areas that they are flourishing in close proximity to people. Here's how to keep the neighborhood healthy for humans and foxes: 1. Secure garbage, clean up fallen bird seed, and don't feed pets outdoors. 2. Don't fear foxes but enjoy them from a respectful distance. 3. Respect fox family time. Foxes aren't aggressive but can be protective parents. Keep pets and children away from the den. (Content sample from NWF’s )

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "A giant swallowtail butterfly gets a sip of nectar in a Texas backyard habitat.
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A giant swallowtail butterfly gets a sip of nectar in a Texas backyard habitat. -------------------------------------------- “Seeing wildlife in our yards is a great indicator of the health of the local environment. In fact, the ongoing health of our communities is directly linked to the health of the wildlife with which we share our backyards, towns, and cities. Quite literally, the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat, depends on healthy local wildlife and the natural spaces where they live,” says Mary Phillips, Senior Director of Garden for Wildlife. “When you make simple changes to your outdoor spaces – from whole landscaped areas to a few planters – you are create stepping stones that help reconnect habitats for wildlife across the country.” Anyone, at any age, anywhere can participate in Garden for Wildlife Month with almost immediate positive results for wildlife. Participants can take an active role in potentially doubling the number of diverse local wildlife, while increasing the natural spaces within their communities. But that’s not all: Natural green spaces reduce urban temperatures, reduce water runoff and pollution, and provide a healing connection to nature.

image by National Wildlife Federation (@nationalwildlife) with caption : "Abundant fall and winter rains after years of drought transformed California's Anza-Borrego Desert State Park into a flo" - 1769684738069863389
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Abundant fall and winter rains after years of drought transformed California's Anza-Borrego Desert State Park into a floral paradise last spring, when an eruption of wildflowers, or "super bloom," carpeted the ground for as far as the eye could see. During 35 years as a garden photographer, Saxon Holt had never seen a super bloom until this one, an unforgettable experience. "What made it exciting was not only the quantity of individual flowers but the number of species going off at the same time" - from shrubs and perennials to ephemeral wildflowers that arose after years of dormancy. Among them, these yellow desert sunflowers and purple sand verbenas caught his eye. To capture this scene despite the harsh midday light, Holt lay on his belly and used a telephoto lens to blur the foreground and distance, leaving on the central blooms crisp. "This creates a window and a sense of intimacy, as if peeking into a scene," he says. "You honor the flower by getting down to its level." (Content sample from NWF’s )