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Lion Recovery Fund

Bio We've lost half of the worlds lions in the last 25 years. That's why the Lion Recovery Fund was created—to help bring back lions!

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Suggested users for Instagram Profile "Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery)"
Gideon Akande (@getfitwithgiddy) Instagram Profile Photo getfitwithgiddy

Gideon Akande

Behati Prinsloo Levine (@behatiprinsloo) Instagram Profile Photo behatiprinsloo

Behati Prinsloo Levine

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Yuwei Zhangzou

Louis Cole (@funforlouis) Instagram Profile Photo funforlouis

Louis Cole

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GrandCanyonNPS

Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery)

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image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Do lions climb trees? 🤔 Although cats are known for their climbing abilities, it is actually highly uncommon for lions t" - 1827921505466258743
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Do lions climb trees? 🤔 Although cats are known for their climbing abilities, it is actually highly uncommon for lions to climb trees. There are very few lion populations known for this ability, one being in Uganda's Queen Elizabeth National Park. It is believed that lions climb trees to escape the heat or reduce irritation from biting flies. We'll never quite know for sure why these lions climb, but they sure do look like they enjoy it! Photo: @petelindseyafrica

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image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Did you know that with the right resources and protection, Africa's parks and reserves could have three to four times th" - 1826994881472460904
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Did you know that with the right resources and protection, Africa's parks and reserves could have three to four times the number of lions as we have today? This is why we work closely with local organizations and law enforcement to provide grants that recover habitats and protect the lions within them. Photo: Susan McConnell

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image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "We've lost half of the lions in Africa over the past 25 years. This loss is dramatic and calls for immediate and innovat" - 1825599371427512849
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We've lost half of the lions in Africa over the past 25 years. This loss is dramatic and calls for immediate and innovative action. @wildnetorg and @leonardodicapriofdn launched the Lion Recovery Fund last year to invest in the very best projects to conserve lions, protect habitats, and empower communities. Check out the link in our bio to learn more about our approach to save Africa's lions. Photo: John McCormack.

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Ruaha National Park in Tanzania is considered one of the most significant lion populations in Africa and we must protect" - 1824888906787554707
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Ruaha National Park in Tanzania is considered one of the most significant lion populations in Africa and we must protect it. The LRF is funding WildCRU and @ruahacarnivoreproject to ensure lions continue to flourish along the borders of this park. By incentivizing positive interactions between humans and lions, this project demonstrates that when lions thrive, so does the entire community. Photo: Ruaha Carnivore Project

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Lions are an 'umbrella species'—investing in their conservation protects habitats and all of the species living inside t" - 1821200489654456289
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Lions are an 'umbrella species'—investing in their conservation protects habitats and all of the species living inside those habitats. YOU can help us in this work of turning landscapes into lionscapes at lionrecoveryfund.org (link in bio). Photo: John McCormack

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Protect the prey, secure the habitat, and reduce the number of lions killed by people. If we can collectively achieve those things, we will succeed in conserving the King of the Beasts. If we manage that, African people and economies will be the ultimate winners. Photos by @donjooste and @petelindseyafrica

The LRF has supported the exciting Nsumbu-Tanganyika Conservation Project (NTCP), which is a partnership between the Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP) and @frankfurt.zoological.society which aims to help rehabilitate the complex of protected areas (PAs) around Lake Tanganyika in northern Zambia. Those PAs have huge potential for lion conservation, but have become depleted over recent years due to chronic funding shortages - a problem that the NTCP is tackling. Lions have become extremely rare in the area, but the plan is to provide support to the management of the area which will allow prey populations, and ultimately lions, to recover. Early indications are positive. In Nsumbu, the NTCP team has established an extensive network of camera traps which are documenting signs of encouraging increases in wildlife numbers. On one camera recently, over 40 animals were caught walking towards water on a single afternoon - which is very encouraging, given how depleted wildlife populations in the area were until recently. Perhaps more importantly, among thousands of photos taken since the start of the project, there have been many times where rangers have been caught on camera, but not one incident where poachers have been recorded. We would like to congratulate the DWNP for engaging in innovative partnerships such as these and for the key role they play in their success. Photos by Craig Zytkow

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "The community lands around and in between Africa’s protected areas are hugely important for lion conservation. If co-exi" - 1817428973460648970
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The community lands around and in between Africa’s protected areas are hugely important for lion conservation. If co-existence can be achieved between people and lions on the rangelands, the resilience of core protected populations will be much greater. The benefits to people can also be significant. Wildlife is a key part of the rich cultural heritage of Africa and can offer important livelihood opportunities for rural communities via tourism. Achieving co-existence is not easy, but possible. The Lion Recovery Fund supports projects that create incentives for people to live with wildlife; tackle human-wildlife conflict; support the governance and management of community-owned wildlife areas; promote land-use planning; and support sustainable management of livestock and rangelands. Perspective and photo by LRF Director, @petelindseyafrica

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "The LRF has provided a grant to @conservationwildlifefund (CWF) to support their efforts to undertake anti-poaching patr" - 1816071846263271056
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The LRF has provided a grant to @conservationwildlifefund (CWF) to support their efforts to undertake anti-poaching patrols in the buffer areas adjacent to Hwange National Park (in collaboration with the Forestry Commission and with the Zimbabwe Parks Authority). The idea behind this is to help them tackle bushmeat poaching, which affects lions by reducing their prey densities and by causing deaths of lions in snares. However, once again this grant demonstrates how support for lions can benefit a wide-range of other species. In May, the CWF anti-poaching unit, in conjunction with Zim Parks and the police managed to arrest a gang of poachers who have been involved in killing elephants using cyanide poison. This arrest was made possible through intelligence derived from informer networks, paid for in part by the LRF. We would like to congratulate CWF and the impressive efforts of the Zim authorities. Lions are a very good example of an ‘umbrella species’ - whereby investing in their conservation can protect habitats and all of the species that occur therein. Photo @petelindseyafrica

Instagram Image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Lion conservation and the umbrella effect. The LRF is a firm believer in making strategic investments that benefit lands" at Mozambique - 1814427962278097969
Mozambique Report Download 3 816

Lion conservation and the umbrella effect. The LRF is a firm believer in making strategic investments that benefit landscapes and the full spectrum of wildlife that occurs within them, and not just lions. We had recent evidence of the value of this approach from our grantee @greaterlimpopocarnivores With LRF support, the GLCP have develop the 'Limpopo Lion Protection Unit' which tackles targeted lion poaching, and poaching of wildlife for bushmeat. Bushmeat poaching results in the loss of prey for lions and other predators. In addition, bushmeat poachers use wire snares which indiscriminately catch a wide range of species, including lions and cheetahs. The GLCP team recently sighted this beautiful family of cheetahs in the operational area of the LLPU. We are hopeful that the efforts of the LLPU will keep these beautiful cheetahs, as well as the resident lions safe. GLCP works in partnership with @peaceparks and with ANAC, the Mozambican wildlife authorities.

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Due to poaching and the bushmeat trade, prey in Zambia’s Nsumbu National Park has become scarce and lion numbers are ext" - 1812561016733420105
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Due to poaching and the bushmeat trade, prey in Zambia’s Nsumbu National Park has become scarce and lion numbers are extremely low. However, there is enormous potential that this landscape will once again be home to a large lion population. LRF's grantee @frankfurt.zoological.society is supporting Zambia’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DNPW) in managing the vast protected areas around Lake Tanganyika from poaching. These collaborative partnerships give us hope that lion recovery is possible. Photo by @susankmcconnell

Instagram Image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Are you committed to protecting their future? These cubs were photographed in Zambia's Kafue National Park, which unfort" at Kafue National Park - 1811050849759988664

Are you committed to protecting their future? These cubs were photographed in Zambia's Kafue National Park, which unfortunately experiences high levels of poaching. However, encouragingly, great efforts are being made by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks in conjunction with partners such as @pantheracats @game_rangers_international and @zcp_org to tackle this threat. Learn more about how you can help us protect lions, just like these cubs, across Africa. Link in bio. Photo by Milan Vinks @m_vinx

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Hello, weekend! 🦁🌞 #fridayfeeling #lions #savelions #lionrecovery #weekendvibes  Photo by Steve Mandel" - 1807648709133792256
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Hello, weekend! 🦁🌞 Photo by Steve Mandel

Kafue National Park lies at the heart of a massive 25,600 square mile wilderness. That’s an area nearly 3x larger than Yellowstone National Park. Kafue holds a significant population of lions, but one that could be much larger if the principal threats were controlled. In fact, Kafue represents one of the sites with the greatest potential for recovery in lion numbers in Africa. Lions are greatly limited in Kafue by poaching of their prey for meat. Additionally, lions are sometimes caught as by-catch in the wire snares used by poachers to catch antelopes and buffaloes. The LRF is proud to announce a grant to @pantheracats to help them in their efforts to tackle bushmeat poaching. Panthera are working to support the law enforcement efforts of the Department of National Parks and Wildlife. Adopting a strategic approach, they are focusing on the parts of the park that have the greatest poaching pressure, that are of the highest value for predators and to tourism. Protecting the tourism cores is essential, because tourism revenue contributes to the operational costs of the park. First photo by @m_vin. The second photo is by @pantheracats and features an Anti-poaching unit funded and equipped by Panthera, with support from LRF and Foundation Segre.

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Conservation isn't easy, but we are thrilled when we can share success stories thanks to your support and the work of ou" - 1805248626505439669
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Conservation isn't easy, but we are thrilled when we can share success stories thanks to your support and the work of our grantees. LRF grantee @africanparksnetwork has had massive success taking highly-depleted protected areas in Malawi, like Liwonde National Park, and turning them into places abundant with wildlife. They've increased the number of elephants and cheetahs in Liwonde, and this year they incredibly reintroduced lions into the park. Thanks to their efforts and collaboration with the Malawi Department of National Parks and Wildlife, they're saving lions and bringing revenue and jobs into this region through tourism. In fact, CNN Travel recently named Malawi as a prime travel destination for summer 2018. Photo by @petelindseyafrica

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Happy Father’s Day to our loving protectors. 💕🦁 Photo by Federico Veronesi/@africanwildlifefoundation #fathersday #lions" - 1803810240951433199
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Happy Father’s Day to our loving protectors. 💕🦁 Photo by Federico Veronesi/@africanwildlifefoundation

Instagram Image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "Human-lion conflict represents one of the primary threats to lions. Lions are killed in response to, or pre-emptively to" at Tanzania - 1802329191406676791
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Human-lion conflict represents one of the primary threats to lions. Lions are killed in response to, or pre-emptively to prevent depredation on livestock. Such mortality has contributed to the loss of lions from large areas of pastoralist lands and even impacts populations living primarily in protected areas. Thankfully, there are a range of techniques that have been developed that are remarkably effective at reducing human-lion conflict. Successful application of such techniques has resulted in some amazing conservation successes involving lions on pastoralist lands, especially in parts of East Africa. Scaling up successful approaches to human-lion conflict is a key component of the LRF strategy. We are proud to announce a grant to @biglifeafrica to help them work with communities and partner NGOs to develop strategies to reduce human-lion conflict in the Enduimet Wildlife Management Area in northern Tanzania. Enduimet has major potential for lion conservation, and if successful, the conflict mitigation programme in that area has potential to contribute significantly to lion recovery. Photo by @jeremy.goss

image by Lion Recovery Fund (@lionrecovery) with caption : "The Niokolo-Kobo National Park holds the last remaining population of lions in Senegal with less than 100 lions. Althoug" - 1800261180717954797
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The Niokolo-Kobo National Park holds the last remaining population of lions in Senegal with less than 100 lions. Although the species is at dire risk of going extinct in the country, there is hope. With elevated management and law enforcement presence in Niokolo-Koba, the park has the potential of maintaining a population of hundreds of lions. @pantheracats, a grantee of LRF, is working to establish a 656 square mile secure zone—slightly larger than the size of Hong Kong—in the park with plans to gradually expand this zone. cats Photo Credit: Susan McConnell